Turkey Rounds Up Thousands of Military Personnel – New York Times

ISTANBUL — Turkey’s government, rallying behind its defiant leader, rounded up thousands of military personnel on Saturday who were said to have taken part in an attempted coup, moving swiftly to re-establish control after a night of chaos and intrigue that left hundreds dead.

By midday, there were few signs that those who had taken part in the coup attempt were still able to challenge the government, and many officials declared the uprising a failure.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, speaking to hundreds of flag-waving supporters outside his home in Istanbul on Saturday evening, declared that “the strong aren’t always right, but the right are always strong.” He called on the United States to arrest an exile living in Pennsylvania who Mr. Erdogan claimed was behind the coup attempt.

As the insurrection unfolded Friday night, beginning with the seizing of two bridges in Istanbul by military forces, Mr. Erdogan was not heard from for hours. He finally addressed the nation from an undisclosed location, speaking on his cellphone’s FaceTime app — a dramatic scene that seemed to suggest a man on the verge of losing power. But in the early hours of Saturday, he landed in Istanbul, and steadily found his voice again, lashing out at his opponents, and one in particular.

Mr. Erdogan placed blame for the intrigue on the followers of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania, who was the president’s ally until a bitter falling out three years ago. Mr. Gulen’s followers were known to have a strong presence in Turkey’s police and judiciary, but less so in the military.

On Saturday morning, Mr. Erdogan said, referring to Mr. Gulen, “I have a message for Pennsylvania: You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

On Saturday evening, Mr. Erdogan, standing atop a bus outside his home, pressed this theme in a thundering message to his supporters, calling on the United States to arrest Mr. Gulen and send him back to Turkey.

Interactive Feature | Tumult in Turkey: More Coverage

Even before Mr. Erdogan’s speech, the gist of which American officials have heard before, Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday that he would listen to any inquiries Turkey might have about the cleric.

“We fully anticipate that there will be questions raised about Mr. Gulen,” he said.

In a statement released on the website of his group, Alliance for Shared Values, and in an interview with The New York Times on Saturday, Mr. Gulen condemned the coup, denied any link to it and expressed support for the democratic process, saying that “through military intervention, democracy cannot be achieved.”

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, calling the insurrection “a stain in the history of democracy,” put the death toll in the clashes at 265, including civilians, pro-government forces and troops involved in the coup attempt, and said 1,440 people had been wounded. He added that 2,839 military personnel had been detained.

Later in the day, Defense Minister Fikri Isik said that the state authorities were in full control of all areas in Turkey but that vigilance was required. “We have prevented the coup,” Mr. Isik said, “but it is too soon to say that the danger is over.”

Noting the intensity of the violence that had erupted, Mr. Erdogan said that Turkish fighter jets had bombed tanks on the streets of Ankara, and that a military helicopter being used by the coup plotters had been shot down.

There was also a battle early Saturday at Turkey’s intelligence headquarters in Ankara, which government forces later secured, and a Turkish official said the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, had been taken to a secure location.

In a news briefing on Saturday, Turkey’s top military officer, Gen. Umit Dundar, the acting head of the general staff, said that “the coup attempt was rejected by the chain of command immediately.”

“The people have taken to the streets and voiced their support for democracy,” he said, adding that “the nation will never forget this betrayal.” General Dundar emphasized that only a small minority within the military, including members of the air force, a military-style police force and armored units, had revolted.

“The army is ours,” Mr. Erdogan said Saturday night. “I am the chief commander.”

Supporters of the government demonstrated in Istanbul and other cities on Saturday night, chanting their disdain for the coup attempt as drivers honked their horns. “We will not fall, everything for our country,” some people shouted as they waved large Turkish flags in the air.

Even as it appeared that the elected government had re-established control, many questions remained, including who was behind the plot and what long-term damage had been done to the political system of Turkey, a NATO ally and important partner to the United States in the fight against the Islamic State.

Much of the violence overnight related to the coup attempt was in Ankara, where different branches of the security forces fought one another over control of government buildings, including the Parliament building, where several explosions were reported.

Early Saturday, soldiers surrendered on a bridge that traverses the Bosporus, one of two bridges that the military shut down as the coup attempt began Friday evening. Footage showed abandoned military clothing and helmets along the bridge. The government also moved on a military school in Istanbul, arresting dozens.

Disciplinary actions extended to the judicial system on Saturday as an oversight body, the High Council of Judges and Prosecutors, announced that 2,745 judges had been dismissed, the Anadolu agency reported.

Turkey has a long history of military involvement in politics — there have been three coups since 1960, and the military forced another government to step down — and as the country became deeply polarized in recent years between supporters of Mr. Erdogan’s Islamist government and those loyal to Turkey’s secular traditions, many wondered if the military would intervene. Some, quietly, had even hoped it would.

But once the coup was attempted, people in the country, even those bitterly opposed to Mr. Erdogan, seemed to have no desire for a return to military rule. Turks across the political spectrum, including the main opposition parties that represent secular Turks, nationalists and Kurds, opposed the coup. So did many top generals, highlighting that the attempt apparently did not have deep support even in the military.

Speaking from Luxembourg, Mr. Kerry reiterated the United States’ support for the Erdogan government. “We stand by the government of Turkey,” he said.

Mr. Kerry said it was not surprising that the United States and Turkey’s other NATO allies had not been aware of the coup before it occurred.

“If you’re planning a coup, you don’t exactly advertise it to your partners in NATO,” Mr. Kerry said. “It surprised everybody, including the people in Turkey. I must say it does not appear to be a very brilliantly planned or executed event.”

Chancellor Angela Merkel and Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier of Germany expressed concern about the developments in Turkey and called for a return to the rule of law, under the democratically elected government. Ms. Merkel said political change should take place only through democratic procedures.

“Tanks on the streets and attacks from the air against their own people are against the law,” she said.

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Turkey Detains Thousands in Military in Bid to Regain Control – New York Times

ISTANBUL — Turkey’s government, rallying behind its defiant leader, rounded up thousands of military personnel on Saturday who were said to have taken part in an attempted coup, moving swiftly to re-establish control after a night of chaos and intrigue that left hundreds dead.

By midday, there were few signs that those who had taken part in the coup attempt were still able to challenge the government, and many officials declared the uprising a failure.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, speaking to hundreds of flag-waving supporters outside his home in Istanbul on Saturday evening, declared that “the strong aren’t always right, but the right are always strong.” He called on the United States to arrest an exile living in Pennsylvania who Mr. Erdogan claimed was behind the coup attempt.

As the insurrection unfolded Friday night, beginning with the seizing of two bridges in Istanbul by military forces, Mr. Erdogan was not heard from for hours. He finally addressed the nation from an undisclosed location, speaking on his cellphone’s FaceTime app — a dramatic scene that seemed to suggest a man on the verge of losing power. But in the early hours of Saturday, he landed in Istanbul, and steadily found his voice again, lashing out at his opponents, and one in particular.

Mr. Erdogan placed blame for the intrigue on the followers of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric living in exile in Pennsylvania, who was the president’s ally until a bitter falling out three years ago. Mr. Gulen’s followers were known to have a strong presence in Turkey’s police and judiciary, but less so in the military.

On Saturday morning, Mr. Erdogan said, referring to Mr. Gulen, “I have a message for Pennsylvania: You have engaged in enough treason against this nation. If you dare, come back to your country.”

On Saturday evening, Mr. Erdogan, standing atop a bus outside his home, pressed this theme in a thundering message to his supporters, calling on the United States to arrest Mr. Gulen and send him back to Turkey.

Interactive Feature | Tumult in Turkey: More Coverage

Even before Mr. Erdogan’s speech, the gist of which American officials have heard before, Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday that he would listen to any inquiries Turkey might have about the cleric.

“We fully anticipate that there will be questions raised about Mr. Gulen,” he said.

In a statement released on the website of his group, Alliance for Shared Values, Mr. Gulen condemned the coup and supported the country’s democratic process.

“As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having any link to such an attempt,” Mr. Gulen wrote. “I categorically deny such accusations.”

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, calling the insurrection “a stain in the history of democracy,” put the death toll in the clashes at 265, including civilians, pro-government forces and troops involved in the coup attempt, and said 1,440 people had been wounded. He added that 2,839 military personnel had been detained.

Later in the day, Defense Minister Fikri Isik said that the state authorities were in full control of all areas in Turkey but that vigilance was required. “We have prevented the coup,” Mr. Isik said, “but it is too soon to say that the danger is over.”

Noting the intensity of the violence that had erupted, Mr. Erdogan said that Turkish fighter jets had bombed tanks on the streets of Ankara, and that a military helicopter being used by the coup plotters had been shot down.

There was also a battle early Saturday at Turkey’s intelligence headquarters in Ankara, which government forces later secured, and a Turkish official said the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, had been taken to a secure location.

In a news briefing on Saturday, Turkey’s top military officer, Gen. Umit Dundar, the acting head of the general staff, said that “the coup attempt was rejected by the chain of command immediately.”

“The people have taken to the streets and voiced their support for democracy,” he said, adding that “the nation will never forget this betrayal.” General Dundar emphasized that only a small minority within the military, including members of the air force, a military-style police force and armored units, had revolted.

“The army is ours,” Mr. Erdogan said Saturday night. “I am the chief commander.”

Supporters of the government demonstrated in Istanbul and other cities on Saturday night, chanting their disdain for the coup attempt as drivers honked their horns. “We will not fall, everything for our country,” some people shouted as they waved large Turkish flags in the air.

Even as it appeared that the elected government had re-established control, many questions remained, including who was behind the plot and what long-term damage had been done to the political system of Turkey, a NATO ally and important partner to the United States in the fight against the Islamic State.

Much of the violence overnight related to the coup attempt was in Ankara, where different branches of the security forces fought one another over control of government buildings, including the Parliament building, where several explosions were reported.

Early Saturday, soldiers surrendered on a bridge that traverses the Bosporus, one of two bridges that the military shut down as the coup attempt began Friday evening. Footage showed abandoned military clothing and helmets along the bridge. The government also moved on a military school in Istanbul, arresting dozens.

Disciplinary actions extended to the judicial system on Saturday as an oversight body, the High Council of Judges and Prosecutors, announced that 2,745 judges had been dismissed, the Anadolu agency reported.

Turkey has a long history of military involvement in politics — there have been three coups since 1960, and the military forced another government to step down — and as the country became deeply polarized in recent years between supporters of Mr. Erdogan’s Islamist government and those loyal to Turkey’s secular traditions, many wondered if the military would intervene. Some, quietly, had even hoped it would.

But once the coup was attempted, people in the country, even those bitterly opposed to Mr. Erdogan, seemed to have no desire for a return to military rule. Turks across the political spectrum, including the main opposition parties that represent secular Turks, nationalists and Kurds, opposed the coup. So did many top generals, highlighting that the attempt apparently did have had deep support even in the military.

Speaking from Luxembourg, Mr. Kerry reiterated the United States’ support for the Erdogan government. “We stand by the government of Turkey,” he said.

Mr. Kerry said it was not surprising that the United States and Turkey’s other NATO allies had not been aware of the coup before it occurred.

“If you’re planning a coup, you don’t exactly advertise it to your partners in NATO,” Mr. Kerry said. “It surprised everybody, including the people in Turkey. I must say it does not appear to be a very brilliantly planned or executed event.”

Chancellor Angela Merkel and Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier of Germany expressed concern about the developments in Turkey and called for a return to the rule of law, under the democratically elected government. Ms. Merkel said political change should take place only through democratic procedures.

“Tanks on the streets and attacks from the air against their own people are against the law,” she said.

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July 11: Dallas, Sterling and Castile – New York Daily News

Let there be healing after killing

Brooklyn: We who are left behind mourn the death of Alton Sterling, lying on the ground with no one to assist him. Diamond Reynolds, we cry for you not being able to hug the man you loved, Philando Castile, as his life was taken before your very eyes. Any movement to comfort him risked your life. Thank God you were able to live-stream the horror for all to see.

Only time can dull the memory of these heinous acts. To the Dallas Five assassinated in the line of duty, we thank you for your service. Heartfelt sympathy to all the families, friends and communities. Let us heal together and prevent these senseless deaths from furthering division. Dorothy Matthews

Whiting, N.J.: While I understand Shaun King’s point that the “time for us to be calm is long gone” and appreciate the fear and frustration of being black in America, I have to believe that the events in Dallas were not what he had in mind. Bill McConnell

Shame on the News

Springfield Gardens: I am incredibly perturbed and deeply alarmed by your use of Alton Sterling’s body on the cover of your July 7 newspaper. I am a black woman, a lifelong Queens resident and am vehemently disgusted by your choice to profit on black pain, suffering and death. We don’t need to see a body, gun wounds, blood and lifeless eyes. Sterling was a person, and that a newspaper like the Daily News chose to post his image for the mass consumption of millions, unwitting commuters, children and teenagers, families, passersby, etc., shows absolute disrespect and a cold indifference to black people and our humanity. Your desire to be an “in your face” news source is hinged on our further suffering. Janelle Marlena Edwards

Worth no words

Manhattan: As common as it is to show everything in a news story, out of respect for his family, friends and decency, could you please remove from your website the still photograph of Philando Castile as he lay bleeding with his eyes rolled into the back of his head and quite possibly dead? It isn’t necessary to the story. Caprice C. Corbett

Judge not

Rochester, Minn.: People nationwide are forming an opinion about what happened to Philando Castile based soley on the aftermath of the shooting. In the video, we don’t see what took place prior. We don’t see the shooting itself. We cannot justly judge anything in this video without knowing what took place beforehand. People are so quick to judge the after-effects of tragic situations. But the fact of the matter is, the only people who know the whole truth are the police, the woman, the man and God. The rest of us have no right to condemn or justify anything. If an officer of the law tells you to put your hands where they can see them, and after you inform them you are carrying a weapon, you reach into your pocket despite being told not to, the consequences of such actions are clear. They are not formed at a moment’s notice based on skin color. Amanda Jean Bradley

It goes both ways

Bayside: In Nicole Paultre Bell’s column on Alton Sterling (“Alton Sterling’s death should raise calls for justice against rotten cops,” July 6), she writes, “Every time an innocent man is killed, I’m right back to Nov. 25, 2006. Of course, there is anger and sadness. Seeing Sterling’s children at the news conference, I immediately thought about my own children who lost their dad Sean — Jada Bell, who is 13, and Jordyn Bell, who is 10.” Here’s my version of that quote: “Every time an innocent police Officer is killed, I’m right back to Dec. 28, 1974. Of course, there is anger and sadness. Seeing the police officer’s children at the news conference, I immediately thought about myself, who lost her, dad P.O. Kenneth Mahon. I was 3 years old at the time.” Melinda Mahon

No justice

Tampa: We expect police to protect the people, yet they are just as dangerous as anyone who commits a crime. I would be very suprised if these officers are found guilty because the judge and jury are predominantly Caucasian. Where is the justice for the African men? Bridgette Welch

No peace

Los Angeles: As a male of color, since I was a child I have lived by a code of conduct common to most of my peers. My goal since I can remember when dealing with the police was not to avoid being arrested; it was make it home alive. It upsets me that the rash of police shootings are being treated like they are a new phenomenon. People of color have been dying at the hands of the police since before I was born. So let me clarify the true meaning of the statement “black lives matter”: It means that black lives matter all the time and not just when other lives are affected. It means black lives are sufficient in and of themselves to justify public interest, action and outrage when they alone bear the brunt of injustice and denial of constitutional rights. When others pay attention to previously ignored problems and claim them as public domain, they do what I call a “Christopher Columbus”: asserting that what already existed did not exist until they became of aware of it and now claim it as their own. This is a condescending and contempt — eliciting behavior common in the American discourse, and as long as it exists and persists, racial relations in the country will be tumultuous at best. Anthony Rucker

Protect yourself

Brooklyn: If I am legally armed and you attack me in my car — as was the allegedly case in the road rage shooting — I would shoot you too. It’s called defending myself. If that had not been an armed off-duty cop Delrawn Smalls attacked, he simply would have done his damage, gotten back in his car and driven away. He made the choice to get out of his car. He chose wrong. Linda Calabrese

Swing and a miss

Fall River, Mass.: New York’s Hometown Newspaper aptly employed the word “rapturous” in its photo caption of Mets fans gleefully flocking with pens and baseballs outstretched for autographs from accused wife-beater Jose Reyes in the July 6 edition (“Amazin’ shame, fans”). The ecstatic image speaks volumes about our society’s mindless adulation of sports figures, alleged criminal history be damned. Charles Winokoor

Accentuate the positive

Walden, N.Y.: I have to agree with Voicers Scott Daly and Heather Whipple. I have never listened to a song and said, “I wonder what ethnicity takes credit for that song” — and I never thought the Red Cross poster was racist. Please, let’s stop looking for things to stir up controversy. Music is for all to enjoy, and the Red Cross poster was about pool safety. Life is way too short, and we are all here together. Let’s do our best to stop looking for things to start problems, but focus on the positives in life instead. Gail P. Ellis

Nothing to see here

Laguna Beach, Calif.: Thursday’s congressional hearing with FBI Director James Comey proved to be another partisan exercise in futility. I worked on Capitol Hill, so I know how the House works. This kind of sanctioned witchhunt, trying to find anything to hang former Secretary of State and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton with, is an abuse of power. Instead of finding a smoking gun, Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz, chair of the House Oversight Committee, and his colleagues barely uncovered a water pistol. In the best interests of the country, it’s time to move on. Denny Freidenrich

It’s IT

Bronxville, N.Y.: Hillary Clinton was as “exceedingly careless” of email communications as the CEO of Apple or any major corporate or government agency is careless. The information technology department is responsible for server and email security, not the user of the emails. When the CEO of Apple sends or receives emails containing trade secrets, he doesn’t concern himself that the communications are secure. It is the technical responsibility of IT to ensure the emails are encrypted and the email servers are secure from hackers. Clinton is not a Microsoft or Unix server certified IT professional. She did not set up the email servers or the security of the application running on the servers. This is a myth perpetrated by the media and GOP critics. I have worked in the IT field for over 30 years. Frank Mallia

Hillarygate

Massapequa, L.I.: Hillary Clinton is a walking, talking human scandal. After Whitewater, Travelgate, Vince Foster, Benghazi and numerous other issues, I am thoroughly convinced this woman could commit a murder on live television and not be charged with a crime. Thomas Ascher

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Manchester bomb scare blamed on training device – CNN

Story highlights

  • Suspicious item was device left behind from training exercise, police said
  • Man Utd will play Bournemouth on Tuesday after “suspect package” forces abandonment

(CNN)A suspicious item found in Manchester United’s Old Trafford stadium ahead of a key soccer game was actually a training device, police said on Sunday.

The discovery of the “incredibly lifelike explosive device” Sunday prompted the evacuation of United’s game against AFC Bournemouth, which was then canceled.
“Following today’s controlled explosion, we have since found out that the item was a training device which had accidentally been left by a private company following a training exercise involving explosive search dogs,” Assistant Chief Constable John O’Hare of the Greater Manchester Police said in a statement.
“Whilst this item did not turn out to be a viable explosive, on appearance this device was as real as could be, and the decision to evacuate the stadium was the right thing to do, until we could be sure that people were not at risk.”
The match was rescheduled for Tuesday at 8 p.m. local time (3 p.m. ET), the Premier League said.
    Read More
    Manchester United's Old Trafford stadium evacuated

    Manchester United's Old Trafford stadium evacuated

    5 photos: Security fears prompt abandonment
    Police officers stand on duty outside Old Trafford stadium after the English Premier League football match between Manchester United and Bournemouth was abandoned Sunday.

    Police officers stand on duty outside Old Trafford stadium after the English Premier League football match between Manchester United and Bournemouth was abandoned Sunday.

    5 photos: Security fears prompt abandonment
    Police officers stand on duty outside Old Trafford stadium after the English Premier League football match between Manchester United and Bournemouth was abandoned Sunday.
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    The decision to abandon the match was made after a suspicious package was found inside the stadium.

    The decision to abandon the match was made after a suspicious package was found inside the stadium.

    5 photos: Security fears prompt abandonment
    The decision to abandon the match was made after a suspicious package was found inside the stadium.
    Hide Caption
    2 of 5
    The package was found in the north-west quadrant of the stadium, which prompted evacuation of the Stretford End and the Sir Alex Ferguson stand.

    The package was found in the north-west quadrant of the stadium, which prompted evacuation of the Stretford End and the Sir Alex Ferguson stand.

    5 photos: Security fears prompt abandonment
    The package was found in the north-west quadrant of the stadium, which prompted evacuation of the Stretford End and the Sir Alex Ferguson stand.
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    Before the abandonment of the match was confirmed, and once areas of the stadium had been evacuated, sniffer dogs were brought in to search the stands.

    Before the abandonment of the match was confirmed, and once areas of the stadium had been evacuated, sniffer dogs were brought in to search the stands.

    5 photos: Security fears prompt abandonment
    Before the abandonment of the match was confirmed, and once areas of the stadium had been evacuated, sniffer dogs were brought in to search the stands.
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    4 of 5
    The Manchester United players, including Wayne Rooney, leave the field after warming up for what would have been their final game of the English Premier League season.

    The Manchester United players, including Wayne Rooney, leave the field after warming up for what would have been their final game of the English Premier League season.

    5 photos: Security fears prompt abandonment
    The Manchester United players, including Wayne Rooney, leave the field after warming up for what would have been their final game of the English Premier League season.
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    manchester united old trafford 1bournemouth fans old traffordold trafford stretford endsniffer dog old traffordman united players old trafford
    “We would like to thank Manchester United’s staff, the police and other emergency services for all their efforts today as well as rearranging the match for this coming Tuesday,” the Premier League said in a statement. “Both Manchester United and AFC Bournemouth’s management has been extremely helpful.”

    Sniffer dogs

    United was due to to face off against Bournemouth in the final game of the English Premier League season on Sunday. The game could have qualified United for next season’s Champions League — European soccer’s biggest competition — if they had won and their local rivals Manchester City lost at Swansea.
    Shortly before the 3 p.m. kickoff, Manchester United staff alerted police to a suspicious item found in the toilets within the North West Quadrant, between the Sir Alex Ferguson stand and the Stretford End. Initially, a partial evacuation of the stadium was put in place while sniffer dogs searched the stands of the 75,000-capacity stadium.
    A sniffer dog patrols the Old Trafford stands.

    A sniffer dog patrols the Old Trafford stands.

    A sniffer dog patrols the Old Trafford stands.
    After the initial sweep a decision was made between police and Manchester United officials to abandon the game and a full controlled evacuation of the stadium was carried out.
    “We don’t make these decisions lightly and we have done this today to ensure the safety of all those attending,” O’Hare of Greater Manchester Police said.
    Bomb disposal experts carried out a controlled explosion of the device and determined it was not “viable.”
    “Everyone remained calm, followed instructions, and worked with officers and stewards to ensure that a safe evacuation was quickly completed,” O’Hare said. “Those present today were a credit to the football family and their actions should be recognized.”
    Earlier in the day, fans praised United and emergency services for their handling of the situation.

    Please pause this evening and be thankful of that extraordinary work of authorities at Old Trafford helping to avoid a potential tragedy.

    — john davies (@renegadestyle) May 15, 2016

    Outstanding work by Old Trafford security & Greater Manchester Police today. 👏🏻Could have been an unimaginable tragedy 😧

    — Liz Moore (@LizWorsley) May 15, 2016

    Later Sunday, Manchester City drew 1-1 with Swansea to secure a place in next season’s Champions League competition.
    West Ham's final match at Upton Park was marred by trouble outside the ground before the match started.

    West Ham's final match at Upton Park was marred by trouble outside the ground before the match started.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    West Ham’s final match at Upton Park was marred by trouble outside the ground before the match started.
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    Objects were thrown at the bus carrying the visiting Manchester United team, and the kickoff time was subsequently delayed by 45 minutes.

    Objects were thrown at the bus carrying the visiting Manchester United team, and the kickoff time was subsequently delayed by 45 minutes.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Objects were thrown at the bus carrying the visiting Manchester United team, and the kickoff time was subsequently delayed by 45 minutes.
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    A woman and a child are helped to safety after bottles were thrown at police.

    A woman and a child are helped to safety after bottles were thrown at police.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    A woman and a child are helped to safety after bottles were thrown at police.
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    Senegalese striker Diafra Sakho celebrates with Mark Noble after putting West Ham ahead in the 10th minute of Tuesday's match.

    Senegalese striker Diafra Sakho celebrates with Mark Noble after putting West Ham ahead in the 10th minute of Tuesday's match.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Senegalese striker Diafra Sakho celebrates with Mark Noble after putting West Ham ahead in the 10th minute of Tuesday’s match.
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    However, Anthony Martial leveled six minutes after halftime and then put Manchester United in front in the 72nd minute after punishing West Ham on the counter attack.

    However, Anthony Martial leveled six minutes after halftime and then put Manchester United in front in the 72nd minute after punishing West Ham on the counter attack.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    However, Anthony Martial leveled six minutes after halftime and then put Manchester United in front in the 72nd minute after punishing West Ham on the counter attack.
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    The Hammers hit back with two late goals, as goalkeeper David de Gea was beaten by headers from Michail Antonio and Winston Reid -- both set up by Dimitri Payet.

    The Hammers hit back with two late goals, as goalkeeper David de Gea was beaten by headers from Michail Antonio and Winston Reid -- both set up by Dimitri Payet.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    The Hammers hit back with two late goals, as goalkeeper David de Gea was beaten by headers from Michail Antonio and Winston Reid — both set up by Dimitri Payet.
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    West Ham has been based at Upton Park -- also known as the Boleyn Ground -- since 1904.

    West Ham has been based at Upton Park -- also known as the Boleyn Ground -- since 1904.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    West Ham has been based at Upton Park — also known as the Boleyn Ground — since 1904.
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    However, next season the English Premier League club will move to the nearby Olympic Stadium in Stratford. West Ham chairman David Gold is pictured outside the venue in March 2015.

    However, next season the English Premier League club will move to the nearby Olympic Stadium in Stratford. West Ham chairman David Gold is pictured outside the venue in March 2015.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    However, next season the English Premier League club will move to the nearby Olympic Stadium in Stratford. West Ham chairman David Gold is pictured outside the venue in March 2015.
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    Fans gathered before the Manchester United game to pay their respects to the club's longtime ground.

    Fans gathered before the Manchester United game to pay their respects to the club's longtime ground.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Fans gathered before the Manchester United game to pay their respects to the club’s longtime ground.
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    This view of the stadium shows the council estate blocks which get a view of the action on match day.

    This view of the stadium shows the council estate blocks which get a view of the action on match day.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    This view of the stadium shows the council estate blocks which get a view of the action on match day.
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    West Ham fans display a flag honoring three of the club's greatest names: former captain Bobby Moore and ex-managers Ron Greenwood and John Lyall.

    West Ham fans display a flag honoring three of the club's greatest names: former captain Bobby Moore and ex-managers Ron Greenwood and John Lyall.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    West Ham fans display a flag honoring three of the club’s greatest names: former captain Bobby Moore and ex-managers Ron Greenwood and John Lyall.
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    11 of 27
    Hammers supporters queue outside a cafe serving traditional East End fare: Pie and eels.

    Hammers supporters queue outside a cafe serving traditional East End fare: Pie and eels.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Hammers supporters queue outside a cafe serving traditional East End fare: Pie and eels.
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    12 of 27
    Such establishments play an important part in the local community.

    Such establishments play an important part in the local community.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Such establishments play an important part in the local community.
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    13 of 27
    The Boleyn Pub is another popular meeting ground for fans.

    The Boleyn Pub is another popular meeting ground for fans.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    The Boleyn Pub is another popular meeting ground for fans.
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    14 of 27
    The Boleyn Ground will be developed into 800 new homes.

    The Boleyn Ground will be developed into 800 new homes.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    The Boleyn Ground will be developed into 800 new homes.
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    15 of 27
    The development will continue the gentrification of east London, which was spurred by the London 2012 Olympics.

    The development will continue the gentrification of east London, which was spurred by the London 2012 Olympics.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    The development will continue the gentrification of east London, which was spurred by the London 2012 Olympics.
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    16 of 27
    Fans have been recalling their greatest memories -- such as this volleyed goal by Paolo Di Canio against Wimbledon in 2000 which was voted the <a href="http://www.whufc.com/News/Articles/2016/May/8-May/The-Greatest-Goal" target="_blank">best ever scored at Upton Park.</a>

    Fans have been recalling their greatest memories -- such as this volleyed goal by Paolo Di Canio against Wimbledon in 2000 which was voted the <a href="http://www.whufc.com/News/Articles/2016/May/8-May/The-Greatest-Goal" target="_blank">best ever scored at Upton Park.</a>

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Fans have been recalling their greatest memories — such as this volleyed goal by Paolo Di Canio against Wimbledon in 2000 which was voted the best ever scored at Upton Park.
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    17 of 27
    West Ham's best league finish is third, in the 1985-86 season of the old Division One, when strikers Frank McAvennie (left) and Tony Cottee (right) scored 46 goals between them.

    West Ham's best league finish is third, in the 1985-86 season of the old Division One, when strikers Frank McAvennie (left) and Tony Cottee (right) scored 46 goals between them.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    West Ham’s best league finish is third, in the 1985-86 season of the old Division One, when strikers Frank McAvennie (left) and Tony Cottee (right) scored 46 goals between them.
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    18 of 27
    Three of the West Ham players pictured in 1964 with talent scout Wally St. Pier went on to win the World Cup with England just two years later: Geoff Hurst, Martin Peters and Bobby Moore.

    Three of the West Ham players pictured in 1964 with talent scout Wally St. Pier went on to win the World Cup with England just two years later: Geoff Hurst, Martin Peters and Bobby Moore.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Three of the West Ham players pictured in 1964 with talent scout Wally St. Pier went on to win the World Cup with England just two years later: Geoff Hurst, Martin Peters and Bobby Moore.
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    19 of 27
    Moore leads the West Ham reserves onto the pitch before his final match at the Boleyn Ground on March 9, 1974 before his transfer to London rival Fulham.

    Moore leads the West Ham reserves onto the pitch before his final match at the Boleyn Ground on March 9, 1974 before his transfer to London rival Fulham.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Moore leads the West Ham reserves onto the pitch before his final match at the Boleyn Ground on March 9, 1974 before his transfer to London rival Fulham.
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    20 of 27
    In May 1967, Manchester United beat West Ham 6-1 at Upton Park to become English champion for the seventh time.

    In May 1967, Manchester United beat West Ham 6-1 at Upton Park to become English champion for the seventh time.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    In May 1967, Manchester United beat West Ham 6-1 at Upton Park to become English champion for the seventh time.
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    21 of 27
    Manchester United also visited Upton Park on October 25, 1975, losing the match 2-1.

    Manchester United also visited Upton Park on October 25, 1975, losing the match 2-1.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Manchester United also visited Upton Park on October 25, 1975, losing the match 2-1.
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    22 of 27
    Warren Mitchell, who played a bigoted cockney West Ham supporter in the TV series "Till Death Us Do Part," is pictured at Upton Park in February 1968.

    Warren Mitchell, who played a bigoted cockney West Ham supporter in the TV series "Till Death Us Do Part," is pictured at Upton Park in February 1968.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Warren Mitchell, who played a bigoted cockney West Ham supporter in the TV series “Till Death Us Do Part,” is pictured at Upton Park in February 1968.
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    23 of 27
    An injured spectator is removed from the crowd during a sixth-round FA Cup clash between West Ham United and Birmingham City at Upton Park in March 1933.

    An injured spectator is removed from the crowd during a sixth-round FA Cup clash between West Ham United and Birmingham City at Upton Park in March 1933.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    An injured spectator is removed from the crowd during a sixth-round FA Cup clash between West Ham United and Birmingham City at Upton Park in March 1933.
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    24 of 27
    Also in 1933, a combined Peru-Chile amateur team visited Upton Park.

    Also in 1933, a combined Peru-Chile amateur team visited Upton Park.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Also in 1933, a combined Peru-Chile amateur team visited Upton Park.
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    25 of 27
    Three years later, St John's Ambulancemen hand out oatmeal drinks in the heat at the match between West Ham and Tottenham Hotspur at Upton Park.

    Three years later, St John's Ambulancemen hand out oatmeal drinks in the heat at the match between West Ham and Tottenham Hotspur at Upton Park.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    Three years later, St John’s Ambulancemen hand out oatmeal drinks in the heat at the match between West Ham and Tottenham Hotspur at Upton Park.
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    26 of 27
    West Ham won the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1965, but 15 years later this match against Real Madrid's reserve team Castilla in the now defunct competition was played behind closed doors due to crowd trouble during the first leg in Spain.

    West Ham won the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1965, but 15 years later this match against Real Madrid's reserve team Castilla in the now defunct competition was played behind closed doors due to crowd trouble during the first leg in Spain.

    27 photos: Bus attack mars Hammers’ farewell to Boleyn Ground
    West Ham won the European Cup Winners’ Cup in 1965, but 15 years later this match against Real Madrid’s reserve team Castilla in the now defunct competition was played behind closed doors due to crowd trouble during the first leg in Spain.
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    27 of 27
    upton park police horsesupton park manchester united busupton park fans helpedDiafra Sakho celebrates goalanthony martial celebratesde gea concedes west ham winnerupton park fans photowest ham olympic stadiumupton park tattoosupton park tower blocksupton park flagupton park pie and eel shopupton park cafeupton park boleyn pubupton park graffitiupton park turnstilesupton park di canio wimbledonupton park cottee mcavennie 1986upton park talent scout 1964upton park bobby moore 1974upton park west ham man utd 1967upton park west ham man utd fans 1976upton park warren mitchellupton park injured fan 1933upton park peru-chileupton park fans 1936upton park castilla 1980

    CNN’s Scott Reeves contributed to this report.

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      Authorities release chilling 911 audio amid hunt for killer of 8 in Ohio – Fox News

      Distressed caller says 'there's blood all over' in disturbing new audio

       

      Authorities hunting for the assailant behind the ‘execution-style’ killings of eight family members in Ohio released  chilling 911 audio Saturday from the murder scene.

      A woman who called 911 to report two of the eight slayings said in a recording that she found her brother-in-law dead and “blood all over the house.”

      In one made Friday morning, the out-of-breath caller says another person in the house also appears dead, and it looks like someone had “beat the crap out of them.”

      The Ohio attorney general said in a press conference Saturday that investigators and law enforcement worked through the night to gather information and execute search warrants to determine who shot eight family members in the head in rural southern Ohio Friday.

      A Cincinnati-area businessman posted a $25,000 reward for information that leads to an arrest and conviction in the brutal slayings.

      In a written statement, Attorney General Mike DeWine and Pike County Sheriff Charles Reader said the investigation into the killings of the Rhoden family is still in its early stages.

      They said evidence continues to be processed and analyzed from the four properties near Piketon where the family members were found dead Friday.

      DeWine told reporters earlier Friday that eight relatives – seven adults and a 16-year-old boy – were apparently shot in the head “execution-style.”

      Pike County Sheriff Charles Reader said at least three young children survived. One was 4 days old, one was 6 months old, and the third was 3 years old. The youngest baby was found in bed next to the child’s dead mother.

      “My heart goes out to my county,” Reader said.

      DeWine said the family’s last name was Rhoden, but did not give first names. “If I was a member of that family, I would be extra cautious right now,” the attorney general added.

      Reader later told a late night news conference he had spoken with the family and gave them “precautionary measures to take.”

      Asked if he had a message for the killer or killers, Reader replied, “we’re coming.”

      Investigators said it was possible more than one shooter attacked the family because the homes were spread out roughly a mile and a half apart. Three of the four homes were on the same street in Piketon.

      Officials said a preliminary investigation revealed that none of the eight killings were by suicide.

      According to the Chillicothe Gazette, the first call of a possible fatality came at 7:53 a.m. The sheriff’s office received a 911 call reporting a possible death at a home owned by a Christopher Rhoden on Union Hill Road. Police found two bodies in that home.

      While deputies were responding to that call, bystanders flagged authorities down and pointed them to two more houses on the same road. Five move bodies were found in those homes and the 16-year-old was later found at a home on Left Fork Road.

      Pastor Phil Fulton told the Gazette that one of the victims was 37-year-old Dana Manley Rhoden, Christopher Rhoden’s ex-wife. Police haven’t confirmed those details

      The Union Hill Church pastor opened his doors to the Rhoden family to help deal with their tragic losses. Fulton told WTTE-TV he’s here for them in this difficult time.

      “This is a time I’ve learned over the years you put your feelings on hold that’s hard to do but you embrace the family as you deal with the family this is where we rely on the lord,” Fulton said.

      He said he has no idea “what kind of evil person” would’ve killed members of the Rhoden family.

      The church will remain open providing meals and other support for those affected by the tragedy, according to WTTE-TV.

      Goldie Hilderbran said she lives about a mile from where she has been told a shooting took place — news she received from a mail carrier who told her deputies had an area blocked off.

      “She just told me she knew something really bad has happened,” Hilderbran said.

      The Associated Press contributed to this report.

      Click for more from the Chillicothe Gazette.

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      Click for more from My Fox 28 Columbus.

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