Tim Cook: Apple Won't Create 'Backdoor' to Help FBI Access San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone – Mac Rumors

Apple CEO Tim Cook has posted an open letter to Apple customers announcing that the company would oppose an order from a U.S. Federal judge to help the FBI access data on an iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. Cook says that this moment is one for public discussion, and that the company wants its customers to understand what’s at stake.

appleresponse
Cook starts the letter noting that smartphones have become an essential part of people’s lives and that many people store private conversations, photos, music, notes, calendars and both financial and health information on their devices. Ultimately, Cook says, encryption helps keep people’s data safe, which in turn keeps people’s personal safety from being at risk.

He then goes on to say that Apple and its employees were “shocked and outraged” by the San Bernardino attack and that Apple has complied with valid subpoenas and search warrants from federal investigators. Apple has also made engineers available to advise the FBI in addition to providing general advice on how they could go about investigating the case. However, Cook says that’s where Apple will draw the line.

We have great respect for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.

Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.

Cook says that while the government is suggesting that bypassing a feature that disables an iPhone after a certain number of failed password attempts could only be used once and on one device, that suggestion is “simply not true.” He says that once created, such a key could be used over and over again. “In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks — from restaurants and banks to stores and homes,” Cook says.

The move, Cook says, would undermine Apple’s decades of work on security advancements that keep its customers safe. He notes the irony in asking Apple’s security engineers to purposefully weaken the protections they created. Apple says they found no precedent of an American company being forced to expose its customers, therefore putting them at a greater risk of attack. He notes that security experts have warned against weakening encryption as both bad guys and good guys would be able to take advantage of any potential weaknesses.

Finally, Cook says that the FBI is proposing what Apple calls an “unprecedented use” of the All Writs Act of 1789, which authorizes federal courts to issue all orders necessary or appropriate “in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law.” The chilling effect of this use, Cook argues, would allow the government power to capture data from any device or to require Apple to create a data collection program to intercept a customer’s data, potentially including infringements like using a phone’s camera or microphone without user knowledge.

Cook concludes Apple’s open letter by saying the company’s opposition to the order is not an action they took lightly and that they challenge the request “with the deepest respect for democracy and a love for our country.” Ultimately, Apple fears these demands would “undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.”

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

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Tim Cook: Apple Won't Create 'Backdoor' to Help FBI Access San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone – Mac Rumors

Apple CEO Tim Cook has posted an open letter to Apple customers announcing that the company would oppose an order from a U.S. Federal judge to help the FBI access data on an iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. Cook says that this moment is one for public discussion, and that the company wants its customers to understand what’s at stake.

appleresponse
Cook starts the letter noting that smartphones have become an essential part of people’s lives and that many people store private conversations, photos, music, notes, calendars and both financial and health information on their devices. Ultimately, Cook says, encryption helps keep people’s data safe, which in turn keeps people’s personal safety from being at risk.

He then goes on to say that Apple and its employees were “shocked and outraged” by the San Bernardino attack and that Apple has complied with valid subpoenas and search warrants from federal investigators. Apple has also made engineers available to advise the FBI in addition to providing general advice on how they could go about investigating the case. However, Cook says that’s where Apple will draw the line.

We have great respect for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.

Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.

Cook says that while the government is suggesting that bypassing a feature that disables an iPhone after a certain number of failed password attempts could only be used once and on one device, that suggestion is “simply not true.” He says that once created, such a key could be used over and over again. “In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks — from restaurants and banks to stores and homes,” Cook says.

The move, Cook says, would undermine Apple’s decades of work on security advancements that keep its customers safe. He notes the irony in asking Apple’s security engineers to purposefully weaken the protections they created. Apple says they found no precedent of an American company being forced to expose its customers, therefore putting them at a greater risk of attack. He notes that security experts have warned against weakening encryption as both bad guys and good guys would be able to take advantage of any potential weaknesses.

Finally, Cook says that the FBI is proposing what Apple calls an “unprecedented use” of the All Writs Act of 1789, which authorizes federal courts to issue all orders necessary or appropriate “in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law.” The chilling effect of this use, Cook argues, would allow the government power to capture data from any device or to require Apple to create a data collection program to intercept a customer’s data, potentially including infringements like using a phone’s camera or microphone without user knowledge.

Cook concludes Apple’s open letter by saying the company’s opposition to the order is not an action they took lightly and that they challenge the request “with the deepest respect for democracy and a love for our country.” Ultimately, Apple fears these demands would “undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.”

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

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Tim Cook: Apple Won't Create 'Backdoor' to Help FBI Access San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone – Mac Rumors

Apple CEO Tim Cook has posted an open letter to Apple customers announcing that the company would oppose an order from a U.S. Federal judge to help the FBI access data on an iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. Cook says that this moment is one for public discussion, and that the company wants its customers to understand what’s at stake.

appleresponse
Cook starts the letter noting that smartphones have become an essential part of people’s lives and that many people store private conversations, photos, music, notes, calendars and both financial and health information on their devices. Ultimately, Cook says, encryption helps keep people’s data safe, which in turn keeps people’s personal safety from being at risk.

He then goes on to say that Apple and its employees were “shocked and outraged” by the San Bernardino attack and that Apple has complied with valid subpoenas and search warrants from federal investigators. Apple has also made engineers available to advise the FBI in addition to providing general advice on how they could go about investigating the case. However, Cook says that’s where Apple will draw the line.

We have great respect for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.

Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.

Cook says that while the government is suggesting that bypassing a feature that disables an iPhone after a certain number of failed password attempts could only be used once and on one device, that suggestion is “simply not true.” He says that once created, such a key could be used over and over again. “In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks — from restaurants and banks to stores and homes,” Cook says.

The move, Cook says, would undermine Apple’s decades of work on security advancements that keep its customers safe. He notes the irony in asking Apple’s security engineers to purposefully weaken the protections they created. Apple says they found no precedent of an American company being forced to expose its customers, therefore putting them at a greater risk of attack. He notes that security experts have warned against weakening encryption as both bad guys and good guys would be able to take advantage of any potential weaknesses.

Finally, Cook says that the FBI is proposing what Apple calls an “unprecedented use” of the All Writs Act of 1789, which authorizes federal courts to issue all orders necessary or appropriate “in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law.” The chilling effect of this use, Cook argues, would allow the government power to capture data from any device or to require Apple to create a data collection program to intercept a customer’s data, potentially including infringements like using a phone’s camera or microphone without user knowledge.

Cook concludes Apple’s open letter by saying the company’s opposition to the order is not an action they took lightly and that they challenge the request “with the deepest respect for democracy and a love for our country.” Ultimately, Apple fears these demands would “undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.”

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

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Tim Cook: Apple Won't Create 'Backdoor' to Help FBI Access San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone – Mac Rumors

Apple CEO Tim Cook has posted an open letter to Apple customers announcing that the company would oppose an order from a U.S. Federal judge to help the FBI access data on an iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. Cook says that this moment is one for public discussion, and that the company wants its customers to understand what’s at stake.

appleresponse
Cook starts the letter noting that smartphones have become an essential part of people’s lives and that many people store private conversations, photos, music, notes, calendars and both financial and health information on their devices. Ultimately, Cook says, encryption helps keep people’s data safe, which in turn keeps people’s personal safety from being at risk.

He then goes on to say that Apple and its employees were “shocked and outraged” by the San Bernardino attack and that Apple has complied with valid subpoenas and search warrants from federal investigators. Apple has also made engineers available to advise the FBI in addition to providing general advice on how they could go about investigating the case. However, Cook says that’s where Apple will draw the line.

We have great respect for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.

Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.

Cook says that while the government is suggesting that bypassing a feature that disables an iPhone after a certain number of failed password attempts could only be used once and on one device, that suggestion is “simply not true.” He says that once created, such a key could be used over and over again. “In the physical world, it would be the equivalent of a master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks — from restaurants and banks to stores and homes,” Cook says.

The move, Cook says, would undermine Apple’s decades of work on security advancements that keep its customers safe. He notes the irony in asking Apple’s security engineers to purposefully weaken the protections they created. Apple says they found no precedent of an American company being forced to expose its customers, therefore putting them at a greater risk of attack. He notes that security experts have warned against weakening encryption as both bad guys and good guys would be able to take advantage of any potential weaknesses.

Finally, Cook says that the FBI is proposing what Apple calls an “unprecedented use” of the All Writs Act of 1789, which authorizes federal courts to issue all orders necessary or appropriate “in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law.” The chilling effect of this use, Cook argues, would allow the government power to capture data from any device or to require Apple to create a data collection program to intercept a customer’s data, potentially including infringements like using a phone’s camera or microphone without user knowledge.

Cook concludes Apple’s open letter by saying the company’s opposition to the order is not an action they took lightly and that they challenge the request “with the deepest respect for democracy and a love for our country.” Ultimately, Apple fears these demands would “undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.”

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

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Decision day in New Hampshire – CNN

Story highlights

  • Polls across most of New Hampshire open at 8 a.m. ET
  • Outsider candidates favored in Granite State

Polls will open across most of the Granite state at 8 a.m. ET, though a trickle of voters made it to the polls in the traditional curtain raiser in the snow-bound hamlet of Dixville Notch not far from the Canadian border just after midnight.

A cluster of big questions could be answered once the results roll in later Tuesday after a week of frenzied campaigning. The contest follows last week’s Iowa caucuses where Texas Sen. Ted Cruz had a clear win and Democrat Hillary Clinton barely edged out Sanders.

READ: Hillary Clinton on shakeup rumors: ‘We’re going to take stock’

Republican front-runner Donald Trump is in for a nervous night as he waits to see whether he can turn support at huge rallies into votes after falling short of his polling numbers in Iowa last week when his lack of a get-out-the-vote operation was exposed.

Marco Rubio’s stumble under New Jersey Gov. Christie’s ferocious fire at Saturday’s GOP debate, meanwhile, threatens to trigger a late slump in his support, after the Florida senator looked set to use New Hampshire to emerge as the top establishment candidate.

Nightcap: Final hours in New Hampshire: Clintons stand by Sanders hits | Sign up

For their part, Democrats are waiting to assess the magnitude of Sanders’ expected victory over Clinton, which could offer the anti-Wall Street crusader a boost heading into less hospitable territory in southern states.

Campaigning for the primary wrapped up on Monday with Trump and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush trading deeply personal taunts and Rubio trying to bounce back from his tough debate night.

The latest CNN/WMUR daily tracking poll on Monday showed Sanders with a 26-point lead over Clinton. On the Republican side, Trump maintained the lead he has held for months, 31% to next-best Florida Sen. Rubio with 17%. Three-quarters of the polling was completed before Saturday’s debate, so it was unclear whether Rubio had been hurt by his rocky performance.

Among other candidates, Cruz was third with 14%, significantly ahead of Ohio Gov. John Kasich at 10% and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at 7%. Christie received 4%.

But despite his lowly position in the polls, Christie has spent the last few days basking in his debate assault on Rubio.

Under pressure from the New Jersey brawler, Rubio repeated the same line four times during the debate, exacerbating an impression that he was overly scripted.

“When the lights get that bright, you either shine or you melt, and we can’t afford to have a president who melts,” Christie said at a campaign event in Hudson, New Hampshire.

Christie, Bush and Kasich are hoping that Rubio’s rough night halts momentum he built up coming third in Iowa. A strong second place in the Granite State would enhance Rubio’s case that he is best-positioned to consolidate opposition to Trump and Cruz.

READ: Donald Trump or Bernie Sanders? Some voters can’t decide

Trump, for his part, hinted Sunday that he understands how crucial New Hampshire is to his campaign.

“I could say to you if I came in second and third I’d be thrilled, okay? I know all about expectations,” Trump told CNN’s Dana Bash on Sunday. “If I came in second I wouldn’t be happy, okay?”

Bush, who for once equaled or even got the better of Trump on the debate stage on Saturday, has been mounting a last stand in New Hampshire and on Monday lashed out at the former reality TV star on Twitter.

“You aren’t just a loser, you are a liar and a whiner,” Bush wrote in an apparent reference to Trump’s claims of irregularities in the Iowa caucus results.

Trump had a scathing response in an interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer: “He’s a stiff. He’s not a guy that can be president. He doesn’t have what it takes.”

He continued, “He’s a desperate person. He’s a sad and, you know, he’s a pathetic person. He doesn’t even use his last name in his ads. He’s a sad person who has gone absolutely crazy. He’s a nervous wreck.”

The Democratic race between Clinton and Sanders also got testy, with a clash over the former New York senator’s ties to Wall Street and her campaign’s attacks on his foreign policy.

On Sunday, Bill Clinton slammed the Vermont senator’s supporters who he said subjected opponents to “vicious trolling and attacks that are literally too profane often — not to mention sexist — to repeat.”

Only hours from the primary, new clouds gathered around the Clinton campaign following a Politico report that the candidate and her husband were disappointed with the direction of her campaign and that a staff shakeup could be in the offing.

But Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta dismissed the report.

“There is zero truth to what you may be reading. It’s wrong. Hillary stands behind her team, period,” he wrote on Twitter.

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