RNC, Donald Trump prepare for rebellion's last chance – CNN

Story highlights

  • The RNC and Trump campaign whip teams have been meeting every day
  • Anti-Trump activists still hope to disrupt the rules process and replace Trump as the nominee
Monday afternoon, after the convention officially begins, all the convention committees will reconvene for what is usually a pro forma vote to ratify their work from the week before. Then the reports from rules, platform, credentials and permanent organization will be up for votes to be adopted by a majority of delegates.
The official nomination vote will be Tuesday.
Any effort to deny Trump the nomination would face an uphill battle. But the party and Trump campaign are aiming to leave nothing to chance.
Leaders and staff from the Republican National Committee and Trump campaign have not taken their foot off the gas since the Rules Committee late Thursday night voted several times to preserve rules binding delegates to state primary results — all but assuring the nomination for Trump.
The whip teams have met daily to keep on top of any attempts by delegates to rebel on the floor.
“We’re confident that the Rules that were passed … will be approved tomorrow during the business session,” Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort told reporters Sunday evening. He said the “never Trump” movement was “more super PAC organizations that were funded by third parties who had nothing to do with the convention and were trying to disrupt the decision making of the Republican voters.”
The delegates frustrated with the process and with Trump as the nominee are attempting last-ditch efforts to keep their movement alive. The ultimate goal for the group, referred to as “unbinding” or “conscience” supporters, is to allow delegates to vote for whomever they choose, with the hope of preventing Trump from getting to the 1,237 number to clinch the nomination on the first ballot and opening the door for someone else — who is yet to be identified — to get the nomination.
“We will not stand for totalitarian party bosses in smoke-filled rooms cutting deals strangling the voice of the delegates and urging us to sing kumbaya,” said Kendal Unruh, a Colorado delegate on the Rules Committee and leader of Free the Delegates. “All this did was prove that Trump would muscle the delegates when given the chance. The grassroots have been betrayed.”
There are a few tactics in play. One is to try to prevent the floor from adopting the rules developed by the Rule Committee. The committee will reconvene Monday afternoon for what is usually a pro forma approval of their work the week before. The committee report will then be presented to the full floor, where a majority, 1,237, will need to approve it.
Delegates Unbound and Free the Delegates, two of the main groups supporting the effort, are still hoping to collect enough signatures to force the issue on the floor, either by convincing 28 members of the Rules Committee to support what’s called a minority report, or by getting a majority of seven states’ delegations to support debate on it. Both are long-shot efforts: In a recorded vote on the issue of binding at the Rules Committee, only 12 members of the 112 on the committee supported unbinding.
Delegates Unbound has been sending supporters text messages urging them to continue the fight. One sent Friday quoted Winston Churchill: “Never give in … in nothing, great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honor & good sense.”
Another tactic would be to convince a majority of delegates to reject the rules, which would force the committee to reopen debate and put the 2012 rules back in place as temporarily governing the convention. Delegates could also symbolically walk off the floor during the nomination roll call, though per the rules approved on Thursday that would not affect vote totals.
A separate effort led by former Ted Cruz delegate director Ken Cuccinelli has also been trying to get signatures for minority reports on a series of procedural reforms like rewarding states that close their primaries. He has been keeping his distance from the delegate unbinding groups, but many of the same people are active in both efforts.
But the Trump campaign and RNC both remain confident that Trump will be nominated as planned, and that the rules as written by the committee will go into effect. Whips have been keeping up with events, and a Trump campaign text messaging system for delegates will also be used during convention week.
“Donald Trump is going to be the nominee and there is no chance the effort to unbind delegates will succeed,” said Steve Duprey, an RNC committeeman from New Hampshire and Rules Committee delegate. “They had a more than ample chance to make their case at the Rules Committee and were spectacularly unsuccessful.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

Nation reacts after 3 officers killed in Baton Rouge – CNN

Story highlights

  • Shooting took place Sunday morning in Baton Rouge
  • Three officers were killed and three were injured
  • Police around the country are taking precautions in light of shooting
Their deaths have kept the spotlight on a region where the shooting death of Alton Sterling at the hands of police began what has been two weeks of national turmoil.
“We as a nation have to be loud and clear that nothing justifies violence against law enforcement,” President Barack Obama said after Sunday’s attack. “Attacks on police are an attack on all of us, and the rule of law that makes society possible.”
Now, police across the country are taking numerous precautions.
The New York Police Department is doubling up all foot patrols and security posts, according to a memo obtained by CNN. Officers are also being instructed to take all meals and personal breaks in pairs.
In Cleveland, the police union is asking Gov. John Kasich to temporarily restrict the state’s open carry laws for the Republican National Convention in light of the events in Baton Rouge.
To better protect its officers, the Boston Police Department is requiring that two officers be in every patrol unit.
Although Baton Rouge is “hundreds of miles away from Boston, the pain and suffering caused by the loss of these officers in the line of duty is felt deeply by the men and women of the BPD,” Boston Police Commissioner William Evans said Sunday. “This all too common trend we are seeing of violence against law enforcement officers who are out there each day serving and protecting neighborhoods across the country is alarming and disheartening.”
Obama urged a stop to the bloodshed.
“Only we can prove, through words and through deeds, that we will not be divided,” the President said Sunday. “And we’re going to have to keep on doing it again and again and again. That’s how this country gets united.”

‘No talking, just shooting’

The shooting Sunday took place around 8:40 a.m. (9:40 a.m. ET) in the city of about 230,000 people, already tense after the high-profile police shooting of Sterling, an African-American man, on July 5.
On Sunday, police received a call of a “suspicious person walking down Airline Highway with an assault rifle,” a source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN.
When police arrived, the shooting began.
“There was no talking, just shooting,” Baton Rouge Police Cpl. L.J. McKneely said.
The officers who responded to Sunday’s shootings killed Gavin Long in a gunbattle after the other officers were ambushed, police sources told CNN. The murder weapon was an AR-15 style semi-automatic rifle, law enforcement sources told CNN.
At an afternoon news conference, local and state authorities, including Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, said Long was thought to be the lone gunman. Earlier reports had said authorities believed there might have been more than one attacker. Edwards described the shooting as an “absolutely unspeakable heinous attack.”
The Louisiana State Police said they questioned and released two people in relation to the attack, and no charges have been filed.

The victims

The three law-enforcement officers killed in Baton Rough, Louisiana, were, from left, Montrell Jackson, Brad Garafola and Matthew Gerald.

The three law-enforcement officers killed in Baton Rough, Louisiana, were, from left, Montrell Jackson, Brad Garafola and Matthew Gerald.

Officers Jackson, 32, and Gerald, 41, both worked for the Baton Rouge Police Department.
Gerald had been serving for less than a year and, like Jackson, was assigned to the uniform patrol bureau, according to the department.
Jackson had posted on Facebook on July 8 how physically and emotionally drained he had been since protests had erupted in Baton Rouge after the July 5 killing of Alton Sterling by police.
“I swear to God I love this city, but I wonder if this city loves me. In uniform I get nasty, hateful looks and out of uniform some consider me a threat. … These are trying times. Please don’t let hate infect your heart.”
Garafola worked for the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office for 24 years, according to Casey Rayborn Hicks, a spokesman for the sheriff’s office.
He was 45 years old.
The gunman also critically wounded a deputy who is “fighting for his life,” said East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff Sid Gautreaux. Another wounded deputy and police officer have non-life-threatening wounds, law officers said.
Authorities later identified 41-year-old Nicholas Tullier as an officer in critical condition.
Bruce Simmons, a 51-year-old with 23 years of service, sustained non-life threatening injuries, authorities said.

The shooter

Authorities say Gavin Long carried out the attack Sunday on law enforcement in Louisiana.
Long, a black man from Kansas City, Missouri, was a Marine who was discharged as a sergeant in 2010.
He left a long trail of information online about his beliefs under the pseudonym Cosmo Setepenra.

Police had been on alert

Since the shooting death of Sterling by Baton Rouge police, the department has worried about threats against officers.
It has been an emotionally charged few days across the country because of the protests stemming from the Sterling shooting and the shooting by police of Philando Castile in Minnesota, plus the ambush on Dallas police officers in which a sniper killed five officers.
“This is an unspeakable and unjustified attack on all of us at a time when we need unity and healing,” Gov. Edwards said Sunday in the hours after the Baton Rouge shooting.
Quinyetta McMillon, mother of Sterling’s son Cameron, put out a statement through her lawyers condemning the ambush.
“We are disgusted by the despicable act of violence today that resulted in the shooting deaths of members of the Baton Rouge law enforcement,” she said. “My hope is that one day soon we can come together and find solutions to the very important issues facing our nation rather than continuing to hurt one another.”

CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz, Evan Perez, Diane Ruggiero, Ashley Fantz, Sheena Jones, Don Lemon, Carma Hassan, Pamela Brown, Mary Lynn Ryan, Vivian Kuo and Nick Valencia contributed to this report.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

Gavin Long: Who is Baton Rouge cop killer? – CNN

Story highlights

  • Gavin Long was discharged from the Marines in 2010
  • He left a large footprint online
Investigators trying to figure out why a Marine sergeant would eventually murder police in broad daylight will likely look to the writings and online footprint of Cosmo Setepenra, the name Long legally changed his name to.
Setepenra wrote books about “esoteric health and nutritional practices” and “how to develop your higher-self.”
13 days in Baton Rouge

13 days in Baton Rouge

On two separate websites he describes himself as a “Freedom Strategist, Mental Game Coach, Nutritionist, Author and Spiritual Advisor.
And in one video online he claims that victims of bullying need to resort to brute force: “100% have been successful through fighting back. Through bloodshed. Zero have been successful just over simply protesting. It has never worked, and it never will.”
Here’s what we know about Long’s background and the views and opinions he espoused under the Setepenra pseudonym.

Long’s time in Dallas

In a recent video posted on YouTube July 10, Long, who was African-American, speaks at the camera eloquently about recent protests and officer-involved shootings, often employing the motifs of blood and money and revolution.
He cites figures ranging from Nat Turner to Malcolm X and George Washington.
That video, he says, was recorded from Dallas, where five police officers were recently killed by a sniper targeting cops.
Long mentions the July 4 holiday as a celebration of an uprisings against oppressive forces, and without mentioning Micah Xavier Johnson — the Dallas shooter — by name, he questions why some violent actions are perceived as criminal while others are celebrated.
A video posted two days earlier is a bit more cryptic, but makes more sense in the aftermath of his shooting rampage.
“I just wanted to let y’all know, don’t affiliate me with nothing,” he says. He says he wanted people to know that his actions were his alone.
He then goes on to list organizations he may be affiliated with — including the Nation of Islam (which he says he was a member of), Floyd Mayweather’s The Money Team (he’s wearing their hat) and terror groups like ISIS.
“I thought my own stuff; I made my own decisions; I’m the one who gotta listen to the judgment,” Long added.

The Washitaw Nation

After he was killed, investigators found a card on Long’s body suggesting he was a member of the Washitaw Nation, according to two law enforcement officials.
The Southern Poverty Law Center describes the Washitaw Nation “as a sovereign tribe descended from pre-Columbian blacks who settled in North America.”
Long legally changed his name to Cosmo Ausar Setepenra in May 2015, claiming that he was “seeking to correct” his name, because he was part of the indigenous society, United Washitaw De Dugdahmoundvah Mu’er nation.
The group is just one of many fringe groups to which the gunman may have belonged.
Long followed several conspiracy groups devoted to government surveillance and monitoring. An email address linked to him showed that he was a member of a support group in an organization called Freedom from Covert Harassment and Surveillance.
The group’s mission is to help those “marginalized and abused by … remote brain experimentation, remote neural monitoring of an entire humans body.”
On that site he’s identified as a “Buddy” representing other “targets” of government surveillance.
The FBI is vetting the claim Long made on YouTube that he was a member of the Nation of Islam. An official said the belief is that Long identified as being associated with the black separatist movement in some capacity but there is no indication he was directed by it. The law enforcement official said the FBI has no indication any black separatist or other domestic terrorist groups are supporting or sending people to kill cops.

Marine service

Long joined the Marine corps in 2008 and worked as a data network specialist, according to the U.S. military.
He was deployed to Iraq and spent time in California and Japan before being discharged at the rank of sergeant in 2010.
He received a handful of awards, including the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal.

The shooting

Two law enforcement sources told CNN that Long rented a car in Kansas City after the Dallas shootings and drove it to Baton Rouge.
Since one of his YouTube videos was posted from Dallas on July 10th, it’s likely he made the trip to Baton Rouge from Dallas.
He was not alone during his stay in Baton Rouge, a law enforcement source told CNN. But, it’s unclear if his associated were actively involved in any plot.
The shooting began Sunday when police received a call of a “suspicious person walking down Airline Highway with an assault rifle,” a source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN.
When police arrived, they were ambushed. Long was wielding an AR-15 style semi-automatic rifle, law enforcement sources told CNN.
“There was no talking, just shooting,” Baton Rouge Police Cpl. L.J. McKneely said.
Police officers who responded to Sunday’s shootings killed Long in a minutes-long gunbattle.
“He wasn’t robbing a bank,” an official told CNN. “He was armed to shoot it out with police.”

CNN’s Steve Visser, Patricia DiCarlo, Curt Devine, Evan Perez and Shimon Prokupecz contributed to this report

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

Baton Rouge shooting: 3 officers dead; shooter was Missouri man, sources say – CNN

Story highlights

  • Relatives identify one of the fallen officers
  • A 29-year-old Missouri man is identified by sources as the shooter
  • Louisiana authorities say there is no “active shooter scenario” in Baton Rouge
Louisiana State Police announced last week that they had received credible threats of lethal plots against Baton Rouge police and had arrested three men and a 13-year-old boy.
On Sunday, a man identified as Gavin Long of Kansas City went on a shooting rampage on his 29th birthday that left two police officers and a sheriff’s deputy dead, police sources said. Long was a former Marine who spent time in Iraq and was discharged at the rank of sergeant in 2010, according to the U.S. military.
Police have not released the names of the victims but one was identified by family members as Officer Montrell Jackson, according to Jackson’s aunt.
“Today isn’t going too well,” she said.
Baton Rouge Officer Montrell Jackson was killed during a firefight in Baton Rouge, Louisiana Sunday morning.

Baton Rouge Officer Montrell Jackson was killed during a firefight in Baton Rouge, Louisiana Sunday morning.

Responding police officers killed Long, who was born on July 17, 1987, in a gunbattle after the other officers were ambushed, police sources told CNN.
Two Baton Rouge police officers — ages 41 and 49 — died, said Police Chief Carl Dabadie. The gunman also killed a 45-year-old sheriff’s deputy and critically wounded a 41-year-old deputy who is “fighting for his life,” said East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff Sid Gautreaux.
Another wounded deputy and police officer have non-life-threatening wounds, law officers said.
At an afternoon news conference, local and state authorities, including Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, said Long was thought to be the lone gunman. Earlier reports had said authorities believed there might have been more than one attacker.
There is not an “active shooter scenario” in Baton Rouge, said Col. Michael D. Edmonson, superintendent of the Louisiana State Police.
President Barack Obama on Sunday condemned the killings and all attacks on law enforcement.
“We as a nation have to be loud and clear that nothing justifies violence against law enforcement,” Obama said, speaking from the White House press briefing room. “Attacks on police are an attack on all of us and the rule of law that makes society possible.” In a written statement earlier in the day, Obama called the Baton Rough shootings a “cowardly and reprehensible assault.”
The shooting Sunday took place around 8:40 a.m. (9:40 a.m. ET) in the city of about 230,000 people, already tense after a high-profile police shooting of Alton Sterling, an African-American man, on July 5.
On Sunday, police received a call of a “suspicious person walking down Airline Highway with an assault rifle,” a source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN.
When police arrived, the shooting began.
“There was no talking, just shooting,” Baton Rouge Police Cpl. L.J. McKneely said.
By noon, authorities had secured the scene and were making sure there weren’t any explosives left behind.
Initially authorities believed two other shooters might be at large.
Long was wearing all black and was wearing a mask, Baton Rouge Police Department Sgt. Don Coppola said. Coppola said he did not know what the mask looked like, but that it was “some type of mask to conceal (the shooter’s) identity.”
Since the shooting death of Sterling by Baton Rouge police, the department has worried about threats against officers.
It has been an emotionally charged few days across the country because of the protests stemming from the Sterling shooting and the shooting by police of Philando Castile in Minnesota, plus the ambush on Dallas police officers in which a sniper killed five officers.
“This is an unspeakable and unjustified attack on all of us at a time when we need unity and healing,” Edwards said Sunday in the hours after the Baton Rouge shooting.

CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz, Evan Perez, Diane Ruggiero, Ashley Fantz, Sheena Jones, Don Lemon, Carma Hassan, Pamela Brown, Mary Lynn Ryan, Vivian Kuo and Nick Valencia contributed to this report.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

Baton Rouge shooting: 3 officers killed, suspect dead – CNN

Story highlights

  • Officials think the attack on the officers is the work of multiple gunmen
  • One of the suspects is dead. Authorities believe two others may be at large
President Barack Obama on Sunday condemned the slayings of three Louisiana law enforcement officers, as he called on the nation to condemn violence against law enforcement.”We as a nation have to be loud and clear that nothing justifies violence against law enforcement,” Obama said, speaking from the White House press briefing room. “Attacks on police are an attack on all of us and the rule of law that makes society possible.” In a written statement earlier in the day, Obama called the incident a “cowardly and reprehensible assault.”
[Breaking news update, 4:49 p.m]
The Baton Rouge police shooter has been identified as 29-year-old Gavin Long, two law enforcement sources tell CNN. The shooter apparently died in a shootout with police on his birthday. He was born, the sources said, on July, 17,1987.
[Breaking news update, 4:11 p.m]
There is not an “active shooter scenario” in Baton Rouge, said Col. Michael D. Edmonson, superintendent of the Louisiana State Police. He was speaking at a press conference about the shooting that left three law enforcement officers dead on Sunday.
[Previous story]
In a city already tense after a high-profile police shooting of an African-American man, three Baton Rouge police officers were killed and three others wounded Sunday. Officials think the attack on the officers is the work of multiple gunmen.
Police received a call of a “suspicious person walking down Airline Highway with an assault rifle,” a source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN. When police arrived, the shooting began.
One of the suspects is dead. Authorities believe two others may be at large. The dead suspect in the Baton Rouge shooting was wearing all black and was wearing a mask, Baton Rouge Police Department Sgt. Don Coppola said. Coppola said he did not know what the mask looked like, but that it was “some type of mask to conceal (the shooter’s) identity.”
“If they are wearing army fatigues; if they are wearing all black; if they are wearing a mask; if they are wearing anything that’s out there, please, give us a call,” said Baton Rouge Police Cpl. L.J. McKneely.
Investigators are reviewing a video of the Baton Rouge firefight posted to social media to see who might have been involved, a law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN’s Pamela Brown. The video has since been taken down.
The firefight took place in a part of town that the source described as rough. The area is a known drug trafficking area. It is a location where police often go to grab coffee.
President Obama quickly issued a statement condemning the attack on law enforcement.
“For the second time in two weeks, police officers who put their lives on the line for ours every day were doing their job when they were killed in a cowardly and reprehensible assault,” Obama said. “These are attacks on public servants, on the rule of law, and on civilized society, and they have to stop. …These attacks are the work of cowards who speak for no one. They right no wrongs. They advance no causes.”
The law enforcement official described the situation in Baton Rouge as a powder keg.
The shooting took place around 9 a.m. (10 a.m. ET) in the city of about 230,000 people.
“There was no talking, just shooting,” McKneely said.
By noon, authorities had secured the scene and were making sure there weren’t any explosives left behind.
“After that, we’re going to gather as much information as we can and work this case as best as we can to find all individuals that were involved in this,” McKneely said.
“Somebody might have seen something suspicious, may know of guys plotting to do this. That’s why we’re reaching out to the community.”
Since the shooting death of Alton Sterling by Baton Rouge police earlier this month, the department has worried about credible threats against officers.
It has been an emotionally charged few days across the country because of the protests stemming from the Sterling shooting and the shooting by police of Philando Castile in Minnesota, plus the ambush on Dallas police officers on July 7 in which a sniper killed five officers.
“This is an unspeakable and unjustified attack on all of us at a time when we need unity and healing,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said.
Kip Holden, the mayor-president of East Baton Rouge Parish, said “everything is moving fast.”
“There is still an active scene. They are investigating,” he said. “Right now we are trying to get our arms around everything.”

CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz, Evan Perez, Don Lemon, Carma Hassan, Pamela Brown, Mary Lynn Ryan, Vivian Kuo and Nick Valencia contributed to this report.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico