New Jersey Lawmakers to Vote on Marijuana Legalization Bill Next Week

The New Jersey Senate and Assembly are due to vote on a bill that would make recreational cannabis legal in the state next Monday. Will it pass? At this point, it’s anyone’s guess.

Here’s what we know: Governor Phil Murphy, Senate President Stephen Sweeney, and Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin have their work cut out for them when it comes to getting the bill passed. New Jersey Republicans have proven to be tough opposition for the legalization movement, even when the pro-pot camp has many factors on their side; a broken criminal justice system and the promise of a billion dollar industry and the taxes that go along with it, to start.

“I won’t get into specific names,” Gov. Murphy told the press on Tuesday. “We still have a ways to go, let me just say that.” In the New Jersey Senate, there are 26 Democrats, and the legislation needs 21 of them to vote in favor of the bill to pass. The problem is that some of the party’s players, like Declan O’Scanlon and Kip Bateman, have told media outlets that they will not be voting in the affirmative.

If the legislation does not pass Monday, the Governor has said

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Mexican President Met With Christian Group To Discuss Campaign Against Drugs

For the second time in a month, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador met with a group of evangelical pastors to discuss a plan that would give the religious organization access to radio and TV channels to promote Christian morality, including a “say no to drugs” campaign, reports Mexican newspaper Milenio.

The meeting raised concerns not only among those fearing the end of the separation of church and state in Mexico, but also those who hoped President López Obrador, who ran on a staunchly leftist platform, would work for a more politically progressive country.

“In Mexico, it’s easier for pornographic channels to exist than one that broadcasts about values; love of the country, love of institutions,” said spokesperson for the group, the National Brotherhood of Christian Churches, Arturo Farela. “We need other channels, other radio stations that spread the principles and values that the Bible teaches.”

President López Obrador — popularly known by his initials AMLO — took office in December. He has raised eyebrows by taking actions that some see as woefully similar to his more conservative predecessors. In January, AMLO announced his government would distribute 8.5 million copies of the “Cartilla Moral” or “Moral Primer”, a text written

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Pennsylvania Town Decriminalizes Marijuana, Sees Future in Legal Pot

Civic leaders in the borough of Steelton, Pennsylvania unanimously passed an ordinance to decriminalize possession of small quantities of marijuana on Tuesday evening. At a special meeting called to considerer the proposal, members of the borough council voted 5-0 to remove criminal penalties for first-time offenders possessing less than 30 grams of cannabis. Simple possession will instead be charged as a summary offense and be subject to a fine of $25 to $100.

Brian Proctor, the president of the borough council, said in a press release that the town was actively pursuing cannabis reform.

“Steelton Borough Council recognizes the changes in attitudes towards marijuana nationally, at the state level, and locally, and strives to be at the forefront of progressive marijuana policy,” said Proctor. “We believe policy needs to change with the times. That includes taking a new look at marijuana, its potential to benefit our community, and realigning criminal justice policy to appropriately fit marijuana-related crimes.”

Borough Manager Doug Brown said that decriminalization is just one aspect of the community’s new approach to pot.

“The passage of this ordinance signals the progressive direction Steelton is taking related to marijuana both in terms of righting a social wrong and preparing

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Study Finds Correlation of Daily High Potency Cannabis Use and Mental Illness

What patterns of cannabis use are the most likely to increase someone’s chances of developing psychosis? That’s the question a team of U.K. researchers set out to answer using data from 901 first-episode psychosis patients across Europe and Brazil. The results of their analysis, published Tuesday in The Lancet, describe a clear correlation between daily, high-potency cannabis consumption and psychotic episodes. Yet lead researchers acknowledged that the correlation does not necessarily mean cannabis is the cause of psychosis.

Study Cannot Definitively Pinpoint Cannabis as Cause of Psychosis

Studies that suggest links between cannabis use and mental illness give firepower to policymakers who view legal marijuana as a threat to public health and safety. But a close look at their actual findings almost always reveals a much more complex and less definitive picture of how cannabis consumption intersects with mental illness—and mental wellness.

So what did King’s College London researchers find? Looking at data collected between 2010 and 2015 at 11 sites across Europe and Brazil, researchers selected 901 patients, aged 18-64, who presented to psychiatric services with a first episode of psychosis. Using some complex statistics, researchers compared the cannabis use patterns of the 901 patients with 1237 control subjects from

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National Poll Finds 61 Percent of Americans in Favor of Legalizing Marijuana

Despite the fact that many conservatives continue to rail against marijuana, support for legalizing weed continues to grow across the nation.

According to a new survey, there are now more Americans who support legalization than ever before. And importantly, that support is growing across all demographics and political affiliations.

This massive wave of support comes as more and more states continue legalizing medical marijuana, recreational marijuana, or both. Similarly, the rapidly growing support for legalization could become an important factor in the upcoming 2020 presidential race.

New Survey, New High in Public Support

The new data comes from the most recent General Social Survey (GSS). As reported by Business Insider, the GSS has been keeping tabs on popular opinions regarding marijuana since 1973.

This year, the GSS showed its highest-ever levels of support for legalization. More specifically, the GSS found that a full 61 percent of Americans think marijuana should be legalized.

This stat marks a huge jump over past years. Most notably, it shows a dramatic uptick since 1987 and 1990, the years with the lowest levels of support. Those years, only 16 percent of the U.S. adult population supported legalization.

In many ways, the overall support for legalization is one

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