Ohio Family Killings: Marijuana Grow Operations Found at 3 of the 4 Crime Scenes – ABC News

Ohio’s Attorney General says marijuana grow operations were found at three of the four places where eight relatives were shot dead in “execution type” killings.

Authorities did not provide further details.

Attorney General Mike DeWine told ABC News earlier that authorities still do not have a suspect description or motive in the Friday killings, saying the suspect or suspects took several steps to cover up their tracks and remove any possible evidence that would help police track them down.

He says authorities have received more than 100 tips so far and they are following up on all of them.

“These were pre-planned, pre-meditated execution-type killings,” DeWine told ABC News today. “Four different homes. A case like this is going to take some time.”

The victims were all members of the Rhoden family, officials said Saturday. They were identified as: Hannah Gilley, 20; Christopher Rhoden, Sr., 40; Christopher Rhoden, Jr., 16; Clarence “Frankie” Rhoden, 20; Dana Rhoden, 37; Gary Rhoden, 38; Hanna Rhoden, 19; and Kenneth Rhoden, 44.

Seven of the victims were found in three homes along the same road in Peebles, a small village about 70 miles east of Cincinnati. The eighth victim was found later than the others in nearby Piketon, officials said.

Some of the victims appeared to have been killed in their sleep and were found shot to death in their beds, DeWine said. One victim, who appeared to be a mother, was killed lying in bed with a 4-day-old baby, he said.

Three young children — the 4-day-old baby, a 6-month-old baby and a 3-year-old — were found unharmed at the various shooting locations, said Pike County Sheriff Charles Reader.

At a news conference this afternoon DeWine described the killings as “a sophisticated operation.”

“They thought this thing through,” DeWine said.

Cincinnati-area businessman Jeff Ruby has offered $25,000 for information that leads to the gunman’s arrest, officials said Saturday.

Investigators also released 911 calls that recorded family members finding their relatives dead inside their homes.

One woman called 911, sounding frantic and out of breath, telling a dispatcher she had found blood throughout her brother-in-law’s house.

“I think my brother-in-law’s dead,” she said. “There’s blood all over the house.”

She then said it looked like someone else was dead there, too, before weeping into the phone.

In another 911 call, a man said: “I just found my cousin with a gunshot wound.”

“Is he alive?” the dispatcher asked.

“No, no,” the caller said.

Sharon Fulton, the wife of a pastor at the Union Hill Church, said there was shock within the small community of Peebles, which had a population of 1,782 at the time of the 2010 census.

“When one hurts, we all hurt,” she said.

ABC News’ Alex Perez contributed to this report.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

Obama to sign defense bill with Guantanamo restrictions – Reuters

Weeds and flowers grow near the fence at Camp X-Ray, a prison formerly used to house detainees at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, March 7, 2013.

Reuters/Bob Strong

The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly passed a sweeping defense policy bill on Tuesday and the White House said President Barack Obama will sign it, despite provisions making it more difficult to close the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.The Senate vote was 91-3 in favor of the measure, which authorizes $607 billion in defense spending and includes $5 billion in cuts excluded from an earlier version vetoed by Obama. The president had objected to the previous bill both because of the Guantanamo language and because it eased military spending cuts without also loosening restrictions on domestic spending. The defense bill, which was revised to reflect a two-year budget deal Obama signed into law last week that resolved the spending dispute, easily passed the House last week.The votes for the National Defense Authorization Act, known as the NDAA, dealt a blow to Obama’s pledge to close the prison before leaving office in 2017.White House spokesman Josh Earnest said there are too many important provisions in the defense bill for another veto.”I would expect that you would see the president sign the NDAA when it comes to his desk,” he told a news briefing.

“That certainly does not reflect a change in our position, or the intensity of our position, about the need to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay,” Earnest said.Together with extending a ban on transferring Guantanamo detainees to the United States, the bill imposes new restrictions on transfers to third countries, including Libya, Syria, Yemen and Somalia.Even lawmakers who want to close the Guantanamo prison, such as Republican Senator John McCain, have expressed frustration that Obama, who has been in office since 2009, has not yet sent Congress his plan for closing it.

Obama is expected to submit a plan this week. It will face stiff resistance in Congress and there has been talk that he might resort to an executive order to close the prison.That suggestion infuriates Republicans, many of whom consider Guantanamo essential for the detention of suspected foreign militants. Obama and lawmakers who favor closure, mostly his fellow Democrats, view it as a damaging symbol of abuse and detention without charge.Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid said it was now up to Obama …Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

Does medical marijuana help? It's complicated – Indianapolis Star

Marijuana plants grow at 1012 E. Sumner Ave., Wednesday, June 10, 2015. State and federal authorities raided the large indoor marijuana plant growing operation,(Photo: Kelly Wilkinson/The Star)

I struggle with the issue of legalization of marijuana, knowing what I know as a physician, but understanding the problems associated with its continued status as an illegal drug. For now, permit me to discuss medical marijuana, its potential medical uses, and suggest one change in federal regulation.
The tide has turned in America regarding attitudes toward marijuana. Medical marijuana is now legal in 23 states, and in the near future, medical marijuana will be legal in the majority of states. Colorado, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and the District of Columbia have legalized recreational use; more than 14 states are now considering legalization of medical or recreational marijuana.
A national survey of physicians’ attitudes and beliefs regarding medical marijuana was recently released. Nearly 70 percent of physicians questioned believed that marijuana possesses therapeutic benefits and 49 percent indicated that the benefits outweigh the risks (many physicians did indicate concerns about untoward effects). Sixty-eight percent of physicians in the study responded that marijuana should be a medical option, and when asked if it should be legalized, just over half of physicians answered affirmatively. Surprisingly, a higher percentage of physicians believed that marijuana possesses therapeutic benefits than did lay people questioned in the study.
That being said, review of the medical literature indicates that the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana remains very controversial. From discussions with Indiana physicians, it appears that they have a more negative opinion of marijuana compared to the national survey.
Marijuana and synthetic pharmaceutical cannabinoids (two approved by the FDA and others available in other countries) have demonstrated evidence-based medical benefits for specific ailments by legitimate scientific studies. There are also ample additional credible empirical reports for smoked marijuana. It should be noted that some of the studies used oral pharmaceutical cannabinoid products, not smoked marijuana.
From this experience, marijuana has demonstrated therapeutic benefits for a number of conditions, including moderate to severe chronic pain, especially neuropathic pain; recalcitrant epilepsy; nausea, especially in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy; spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients; and possible benefits in inflammatory bowel disease, fibromyalgia, and glaucoma. It has also displayed utility for stimulation of appetite and weight gain in cancer and AIDS patients with anorexia/cachexia. There may even be an antiviral effect in in late-stages of HIV infection. …Read More

Medical marijuana in Beaverton: City's about to get its first dispensary – OregonLive.com

Updated:
Medical marijuana dispensaries are starting to grow in the Beaverton area with the first to open in city limits soon.
Blooming Deal owner Tyler Walker thinks there’s a market in the suburbs.
Cannabis Nation, doing business as Blooming Deal, is awaiting its Oregon Medical Marijuana Dispensary inspection next week and expects to open once the ink dries on its state marijuana license and it gets a Beaverton marijuana license, Walker said.
If approved, it will be the first such dispensary in the Beaverton city limits, but there are others just outside city boundaries including Growing Releaf, a dispensary west of Oregon 217 near Southwest Canyon Road.
Walker, 29, can cite state and city marijuana regulations off the top of his head. This is his second dispensary. He and a partner owned a Portland medical marijuana shop  but “went their separate ways,” he said.
Walker selected Beaverton because it was more welcoming than nearby Hillsboro.
“Hillsboro is pushing it completely out,” he said. And “Portland is saturated with them.”
By locating in Beaverton, Walker said, people from western Washington County can make the trip.
Walker said he is a tested entrepreneur. He has operated a property maintenance company and built off-road racing vehicles and motorcycles before he and his family decided to open the dispensary.
The store sits in what used to be part of Thailand Restaurant in a strip mall across Southwest Walker Road from Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District’s main campus.
While state regulations restrict such dispensaries from being within 1,000 feet of a school, there are no rules related to park and recreation facilities, according to the Oregon Health Authority. THPRD asked the city council in Oct. 2014 to require a similar distance from its parks, but the city council did not add that to its rules.
“I don’t care how far we are from (a school or THPRD),” Walker said. “Nobody under 18 is coming through that door.”
The store is well-lighted and modest with dark walls and light-colored wooden cabinets.
“We want people to feel comfortable here,” Walker said. “The general public expects it to be a dark and gloomy place. ”
People enter an alcove and must show their medical marijuana cards before being allowed to enter. They will not be allowed to use the cannabis on site, Walker said.
On the cabinets sit lines of small plastic containers. Much like a tea shop, …Read More

Medical marijuana in Beaverton: City's about to get its first dispensary – OregonLive.com

Medical marijuana dispensaries are starting to grow in the Beaverton area with the first to open in city limits soon.
Blooming Deal owner Tyler Walker thinks there’s a market in the suburbs.
Cannabis Nation, doing business as Blooming Deal, is awaiting its Oregon Medical Marijuana Dispensary inspection next week and expects to open once the ink dries on its state marijuana license and it gets a Beaverton marijuana license, Walker said.
If approved, it will be the first such dispensary in the Beaverton city limits, but there are others just outside city boundaries including Growing Releaf, a dispensary west of Oregon 217 near Southwest Canyon Road.
Walker, 29, can cite state and city marijuana regulations off the top of his head. This is his second dispensary. He and a partner owned a Portland medical marijuana shop  but “went their separate ways,” he said.
Walker selected Beaverton because it was more welcoming than nearby Hillsboro.
“Hillsboro is pushing it completely out,” he said. And “Portland is saturated with them.”
By locating in Beaverton, Walker said, people from western Washington County can make the trip.
Walker said he is a tested entrepreneur. He has operated a property maintenance company and built off-road racing vehicles and motorcycles before he and his family decided to open the dispensary.
The store sits in what used to be part of Thailand Restaurant in a strip mall across Southwest Walker Road from Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District’s main campus.
While state regulations restrict such dispensaries from being within 1,000 feet of a school, there are no rules related to park and recreation facilities, according to the Oregon Health Authority. 
“I don’t care how far we are from (a school or THPRD),” Walker said. “Nobody under 18 is coming through that door.”
The store is well-lighted and modest with dark walls and light-colored wooden cabinets.
“We want people to feel comfortable here,” Walker said. “The general public expects it to be a dark and gloomy place. ”
People enter an alcove and must show their medical marijuana cards before being allowed to enter. They will not be allowed to use the cannabis on site, Walker said.
On the cabinets sit lines of small plastic containers. Much like a tea shop, where customers can get a sense of the tea they want by the look and odor before ordering, Walker’s dispensary will offer the same.
Each container will …Read More